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Automotive Engineering Program

Program Outline

Today the automobile industry is experiencing “revolution once in 100 years”, and a wide variety of new technologies have been developed with the keyword of CASE (connected, autonomous, shared, electric). Considering the required knowledge and skills to the next-generation researchers and engineers in automotive industry, our program consists of a combination of “mechanical engineering” and “electrical, electronic and Information engineering” departments. In addition to the fundamental subjects in those areas, we provide unique applied-engineering courses such as hands-on experience of assembling/disassembling cars and lectures by industrial researchers. In addition, many of our students participate in internships during the summer or spring breaks. In the forth year, each student belongs to a research group and conducts a graduation research. This enables students to gain basic research experiences to become leading researchers and engineers in the future. 

Program’s Pamphlet

Mechanical Engineering

School-specific features

After studying fundamental engineering subjects, students study primary subjects of automotive systems in mechanical and aerospace engineering, and other related subjects from different research areas including electrical engineering. (Please see the course
list and syllabus for details.) We aim to cultivate students who can challenge and overcome the difficulties to open a new door. In this context, not only students who are interested in automobiles but also students who are interested in other aspects of mechanical and aerospace engineering are highly encouraged to apply. For specific key words and research themes, please refer to the laboratory list and the website of mechanical and aerospace engineering.
The G30 Automotive Engineering Course offers the opportunities of internships in summer and spring vacations to G30 international students to gain experience of real world engineering related to automotive technologies. These internships are specially designed for G30 international students in automotive engineering course and do not necessarily require Japanese language skills.

Mechanical Engineering

School-specific features

Students first study a broad range of fundamental engineering topics, core electrical,
electronic/information engineering topics, and fundamental subjects of automotive engineering. They then study advanced automotive engineering concepts related to the car’s electrical systems, such as motor control, sensors, and telematics. The objective of this course is to cultivate researchers and engineers who can develop safe and energy-efficient cars with a keyword of CASE. To gain these abilities, students study electromagnetism, electric and electronic circuits, electronic devices, power electronics, software engineering, data processing, and functional material science. For specific key words and research themes, please refer to the laboratory list and the website of electrical, electronic and Information engineering. The G30 Automotive Engineering Course offers the opportunities of internships in summer and spring vacations to G30 international students to gain experience of real world engineering related to automotive technologies. These internships are specially designed for G30 international students in automotive engineering course and does not necessarily require Japanese language skills.

Career Path

Career Prospects

Students graduating from the Automotive Engineering Program generally directly enter companies after graduation or continue their study in a postgraduate educational program, working towards becoming company researchers or university professors. Students entering companies in the automotive industry after graduation are expected to work on the research and development of safe and high-performance automobiles that contribute to a sustainable society. Since automobiles are integrated systems of various high technologies, a broad range of knowledge is necessary to develop such systems. Some students, therefore, also join laboratories other than those in mechanical or electrical engineering and contribute to companies in many other fields.
Students graduating from the Mechanical Engineering course are expected to engage in research and development of structures, vibration suppression, control of mechanical systems, mobility, production engineering in automotive plants, and so on.
Students graduating from the Electrical, Electronic/Information Engineering course are expected to work on advanced motor technologies, power electronics technologies, electric and electronic circuit development, sensing and control technologies, software development, development of electric systems of hybrid and electric vehicles, and so on.

Examples of Career Paths

Graduate schools
UC Berkeley
Carnegie Mellon University
University of Victoria
Kyoto University
Nagoya University
The University of Melbourne
University of Michigan Aerospace Engineering

Companies, etc.
Mercedes-Benz Japan
Futaba Industrial
UD Trucks
Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus